REU students use sand grain guidelines to identify items discovered during a recent geology field trip to a dig site in Columbus County. Student researchers majoring in Archeology, American Indian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, Geology, Paleontology and Marine Science performed field work in a large pit near Old Dock, N.C. as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Biodiversity Conservation June 5, 2008. 
The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, runs through July 31 and offers students from across the nation opportunities to perform research with academic professionals. The multidisciplinary group of students and faculty will compare fossil, archeological and modern marine samples to study how the marine ecosystem has changed through time. They hope to determine the degree and nature of human impact, assess the health of the modern system, and identify possible approaches to protecting biodiversity. 
- UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

REU students use sand grain guidelines to identify items discovered during a recent geology field trip to a dig site in Columbus County. Student researchers majoring in Archeology, American Indian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, Geology, Paleontology and Marine Science performed field work in a large pit near Old Dock, N.C. as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Biodiversity Conservation June 5, 2008. 

The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, runs through July 31 and offers students from across the nation opportunities to perform research with academic professionals. The multidisciplinary group of students and faculty will compare fossil, archeological and modern marine samples to study how the marine ecosystem has changed through time. They hope to determine the degree and nature of human impact, assess the health of the modern system, and identify possible approaches to protecting biodiversity. 

- UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

Tricia Kelley, UNCW  professor of geography and geology, talks with REU students about stratigraphy and field geology during a recent trip to a dig site in Columbus County. Student researchers majoring in Archeology, American Indian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, Geology, Paleontology and Marine Science performed field work in a large pit near Old Dock, N.C. as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Biodiversity Conservation June 5, 2008. 
The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, runs through July 31 and offers students from across the nation opportunities to perform research with academic professionals. The multidisciplinary group of students and faculty will compare fossil, archeological and modern marine samples to study how the marine ecosystem has changed through time. They hope to determine the degree and nature of human impact, assess the health of the modern system, and identify possible approaches to protecting biodiversity. 
- UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

Tricia Kelley, UNCW  professor of geography and geology, talks with REU students about stratigraphy and field geology during a recent trip to a dig site in Columbus County. Student researchers majoring in Archeology, American Indian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, Geology, Paleontology and Marine Science performed field work in a large pit near Old Dock, N.C. as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Biodiversity Conservation June 5, 2008. 

The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, runs through July 31 and offers students from across the nation opportunities to perform research with academic professionals. The multidisciplinary group of students and faculty will compare fossil, archeological and modern marine samples to study how the marine ecosystem has changed through time. They hope to determine the degree and nature of human impact, assess the health of the modern system, and identify possible approaches to protecting biodiversity. 

- UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

“The Earth is warming. Determining what this will mean for future generations is one of the greatest challenges in modern science, and UNCW Environmental Science Studies Professor Paul Hearty has been tapped as one of a world-class team of scientists working to provide answers to this question.”

Read the full article here.

The Earth is warming. Determining what this will mean for future generations is one of the greatest challenges in modern science, and UNCW Environmental Science Studies Professor Paul Hearty has been tapped as one of a world-class team of scientists working to provide answers to this question.”


Read the full article here.

Deep sea drill bits from the collection of Paul Thayer, UNCW geology professor, from 1969.

Deep sea drill bits from the collection of Paul Thayer, UNCW geology professor, from 1969.

Senior geology student Denis Ferreira works with children from. Mark Catholic Church as they search for artifacts and fossils during their visit to UNC Wilmington’s Department of Geography and Geology on Friday, Oct. 21, 2011as part of National Earth Science Week. The students learned about fossils and rocks from geology students, then took their turn at digging for fossils in the DeLoach Hall courtyard.
- UNCW / Jamie Moncrief

Senior geology student Denis Ferreira works with children from. Mark Catholic Church as they search for artifacts and fossils during their visit to UNC Wilmington’s Department of Geography and Geology on Friday, Oct. 21, 2011as part of National Earth Science Week. The students learned about fossils and rocks from geology students, then took their turn at digging for fossils in the DeLoach Hall courtyard.

- UNCW / Jamie Moncrief

Roger Shew, geography and geology, talks about the importance of controlled burns at UNCW’s forest as members of the media witness a prescribed burn. Members of the North Carolina Division of Forest Resources performed a prescribed burn in the area behind Seahawk Landing on the UNC Wilmington campus Tuesday, Feb 15, 2011. A controlled burn is designed to decrease the chances of a more intense and hazardous wildfire by destroying the fuel load of the accumulated layer of leaf litter. The controlled burn will also improve the health of the longleaf pine forest, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem.
Photo: UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

Roger Shew, geography and geology, talks about the importance of controlled burns at UNCW’s forest as members of the media witness a prescribed burn. Members of the North Carolina Division of Forest Resources performed a prescribed burn in the area behind Seahawk Landing on the UNC Wilmington campus Tuesday, Feb 15, 2011. A controlled burn is designed to decrease the chances of a more intense and hazardous wildfire by destroying the fuel load of the accumulated layer of leaf litter. The controlled burn will also improve the health of the longleaf pine forest, which is a fire-dependent ecosystem.

Photo: UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

Dr. Lewis Abrams of UNCW (Geography and Geology) works with REU student Josh Poole (in backpack) as they operate a ground penetrating radar unit at UNC Wilmington Weds, June 25, 2008.  Student researchers majoring in Archeology, American Indian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, Geology, Paleontology and Marine Science performed field work in a large pit near Old Dock, N.C. as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Biodiversity Conservation June 5, 2008. OPTIONAL CAPTION INFORMATION: The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, runs through July 31 and offers students from across the nation opportunities to perform research with academic professionals. The multidisciplinary group of students and faculty will compare fossil, archeological and modern marine samples to study how the marine ecosystem has changed through time. They hope to determine the degree and nature of human impact, assess the health of the modern system, and identify possible approaches to protecting biodiversity. 
Photo: UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

Dr. Lewis Abrams of UNCW (Geography and Geology) works with REU student Josh Poole (in backpack) as they operate a ground penetrating radar unit at UNC Wilmington Weds, June 25, 2008.  Student researchers majoring in Archeology, American Indian Studies, Biology, Environmental Studies, Geology, Paleontology and Marine Science performed field work in a large pit near Old Dock, N.C. as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates in Biodiversity Conservation June 5, 2008. OPTIONAL CAPTION INFORMATION: The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, runs through July 31 and offers students from across the nation opportunities to perform research with academic professionals. The multidisciplinary group of students and faculty will compare fossil, archeological and modern marine samples to study how the marine ecosystem has changed through time. They hope to determine the degree and nature of human impact, assess the health of the modern system, and identify possible approaches to protecting biodiversity. 

Photo: UNCW/Jamie Moncrief

Geology 480/592 Coastal Ocean Methods class Jan 30, 2009.
Photo by Yvonne Marsan (Laboratories Manager in DeLoach) and Dr. Lew Abrams.

Geology 480/592 Coastal Ocean Methods class Jan 30, 2009.

Photo by Yvonne Marsan (Laboratories Manager in DeLoach) and Dr. Lew Abrams.

On November 1st, 2011, Dr. Patricia Kelley, her Geology 132 students and three graduate students traveled to the Waccamaw Formation in Hallsboro, NC. Watch the video to learn about their trip and read more about it here!